Illinois Paternity DNA Testing


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DNA Paternity Testing in Illinois | Illinois DNA Paternity Testing

Illinois Paternity DNA Testing, Immigration DNA Testing, Ancestral DNA Testing, and Surrogacy DNA Testing are all available at DNA Clinic. DNA Clinic can arrange DNA Testing collections in . Furthermore, we have mobile DNA test collectors that can come right to your home.


If your DNA test results are needed for legal purposes (such as child support, child custody, or divorce hearings), we will arrange to have your DNA samples taken at our convenient DNA testing locations or in any of the other Oregon cities listed below.

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How Paternity DNA Testing Works in Illinois
  • Step 1: Place an order for a DNA Testing Service
    Place an order by calling our local Illinois Paternity DNA Testing center at 800-831-0178. You can pay up front or a down payment to schedule an appointment.
  • Step 2: Schedule an Appointment with the DNA Testing Center
    Based on your availability, we will select an appointment and confirm it with you. You can either choose to walk into our local DNA Testing clinic, or have a mobile collector show come to your home.
  • Step 3: The DNA Testing Appointment Itself
    Either at our DNA Testing Center in Illinois or at your home, our trained DNA Test collectors will obtain a sample of DNA by simply rubbing on the inside of the mouth with an item similar to a Q-top. The testing process is very quick. After a few minutes of paperwork, you will be well on your way as your DNA is packaged for processing.
  • Step 4: DNA Laboratory Processing
    Samples are overnight shipped from Illinois to our testing facilities. Our lab technicians generate a "DNA Profile" for each person tested. The lab usually completes the testing within 3 days.
  • Step 5: Delivering DNA Testing Results
    As soon as the results are ready, we'll send you via email a lab certified PDF copy of the results. If any other party needs access to the results, we will email them as well. Many courts will accept an emailed version of the results; however hard copies are also available.
DNA Clinic is a trusted name for Paternity DNA Testing in Illinois. We also have a large DNA Testing network to serve clients in most towns and cities across Illinois. Our goal is to make your DNA Testing experience as convenient as possible for you. With a robust and helpful staff, we are able to schedule your DNA Test within 24 hours of receiving your call. Sometimes we can schedule appointments even faster. If you would like to schedule an appointment, or have any questions, please call 800-831-0178 where our friendly staff is waiting to serve you.


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17 Jan 2021 at 5:52 pm
Pacific white-sided dolphin Katrl swims with her newborn, yet-to-be-named calf at the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. | Shedd Aquarium/Brenna HernandezThe aquarium’s newest female Pacific white-sided dolphin calf was born last August. Students will choose from among five possible names: Harmony, Rae, Joy, Hope and Grace. Chicago Public Schools’ fourth-grade students will be in charge of naming one of the newest additions to the Shedd Aquarium. A female Pacific white-sided dolphin calf, born Aug. 31 to Katrl, has yet to be named, and the animal care team at the Shedd is teaming up with the city school system to choose its perfect name, according to a release from the aquarium. “Every birth at the aquarium is significant and a cause for celebration,” Lisa Junkin Lopez, vice president of learning and community at Shedd said, “but no more than those in 2020 which brought much-needed optimism and moments of delight and respite during a difficult year.” Students voting will choose from five names: Harmony, Rae, Joy, Hope and Grace. Voting begins Tuesday and runs through Friday. Children from 16 classrooms, chosen by CPS, the Shedd and Children First Fund, will also get the opportunity to take a special virtual field trip to the aquarium, the release said. Biologists, veterinarians and caretakers will be on hand to answer questions and share more about the calf. The calf “has continued to grow, thrive and meet important milestones,” and now weighs about 100 pounds, the Shedd said. It has bonded with its mother and begun socializing with other dolphins in the pod. The name will be revealed at the end of the month, the Shedd said, and CPS teachers will also have access to online resources and activities to encourage further environmental study. Shedd Aquarium/Brenna Hernandez Pacific white-sided dolphin Katrl swims with her newborn, yet-to-be-named calf at the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago.
17 Jan 2021 at 5:51 pm
Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will be sworn in by Justice Sonia Sotomayor on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021 | Carolyn Kaster/AP Photo (file)Gov. Gavin Newsom is expected to appoint Democrat Alex Padilla, now California’s secretary of state, to serve the final two years of Harris’ term. WILMINGTON, Del. — Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will resign her Senate seat on Monday, two days before she and President-elect Joe Biden are inaugurated. Aides to the California Democrat confirmed the timing and said Gov. Gavin Newsom was aware of her decision, clearing the way for him to appoint fellow Democrat Alex Padilla, now California’s secretary of state, to serve the final two years of Harris’ term. Padilla will be the first Latino senator from California, where about 40% of residents are Hispanic. Newsom announced his choice in December, following intense lobbying for the rare Senate vacancy from the nation’s most populous state. Harris will give no farewell Senate floor speech. The Senate is not scheduled to reconvene until Tuesday, the eve of Inauguration Day, two weeks after supporters of outgoing President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol as lawmakers were meeting to affirm Biden’s election victory. That siege, Harris said in an interview broadcast Sunday, “was seismic. It was an inflection moment. You know, sometimes we think an inflection moment is the bringing of something that is positive. No. It was in many ways a reckoning. It was an exposure of the vulnerability of our democracy.” Padilla’s arrival, along with Harris becoming the Senate’s presiding officer when she’s sworn-in as vice president, is part of Democrats’ upcoming Senate majority. But the party still needs Sens.-elect Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock of Georgia to be certified as victors in their Jan. 5 elections and then be sworn in. Harris will be the first Black woman and first woman of South Asian descent to serve as vice president, but her Senate departure leaves the chamber’s roster without a Black woman. Harris was just the second Black woman senator, winning her California election 17 years after Democrat Carol Moseley Braun finished a single term representing Illinois. Among many potential successors to Harris, Newsom passed over at least two prominent Black women, U.S. Reps. Karen Bass and Barbara Lee. Bass also was among Biden’s finalists for running mate. Democrats were in the minority during Harris’ four years on Capitol Hill. Perhaps her biggest mark came as a fierce questioner of judicial nominees and other witnesses as a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Harris was viewed as a future presidential candidate almost immediately upon joining the Senate in 2017. She announced her White House bid in January 2019 but dropped out the subsequent December after a lackluster campaign and before the ballots were cast in Iowa’s first-in-the-nation caucuses. Biden, himself a former senator, invited her to join the national ticket in August. The wins by Ossoff and Warnock in Georgia ensured a 50-50 Senate, positioning Harris as the tie-breaking vote for Democratic control. But Ossoff and Warnock cannot join the chamber until Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger certifies the final vote tally. Raffensperger, a Republican, has said he could act as soon as Tuesday, conceivably allowing Padilla, Ossoff and Warnock to join the Senate together as early as that afternoon’s session. But Republicans will maintain a narrow majority until all three take office and Harris sits in the presiding officer’s chair. Harris’ early departure from the Senate has multiple precedents. Biden was the last sitting senator to be elected vice president. He resigned his Delaware post on Jan. 15, 2009, five days before he and Barack Obama were inaugurated. Obama, a senator at the time of his election, had resigned his Illinois seat two months before Biden. Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff, have enjoyed conversations and debates over how Emhoff should be addressed when Harris takes office. During their joint interview with “CBS Sunday Morning,” Harris joked that some of Emhoff’s friends suggested he could be dubbed the “first dude.” Emhoff added there were other ideas “I can’t repeat on national television.” Vice presidents’ spouses — all of them wives before Emhoff — have typically been called the “second lady,” a nod to the “first lady” being the president’s wife. All kidding aside, Emhoff told CBS’ Jane Pauley, he would be the first “second gentleman” in U.S. history
17 Jan 2021 at 5:47 pm
Music producer Phil Spector sits in a courtroom for his sentencing in Los Angeles. | Jae C. Hong/AP Photo (file)California state prison officials said he died Saturday of natural causes at a hospital. LOS ANGELES — Phil Spector, the eccentric and revolutionary music producer who transformed rock music with his “Wall of Sound” method and who later was convicted of murder, has died. He was 81. California state prison officials said he died Saturday of natural causes at a hospital. Spector was convicted of murdering actress Lana Clarkson in 2003 at his castle-like mansion on the edge of Los Angeles. After a trial in 2009, he was sentenced to 19 years to life. While most sources give Spector’s birth date as 1940, it was listed as 1939 in court documents following his arrest. His lawyer subsequently confirmed that date to The Associated Press. Clarkson, star of “Barbarian Queen” and other B-movies, was found shot to death in the foyer of Spector’s mansion in the hills overlooking Alhambra, a modest suburban town on the edge of Los Angeles. Until the actress’ death, which Spector maintained was an “accidental suicide,” few residents even knew the mansion belonged to the reclusive producer, who spent his remaining years in a prison hospital east of Stockton. Decades before, Spector had been hailed as a visionary for channeling Wagnerian ambition into the three-minute song, creating the “Wall of Sound” that merged spirited vocal harmonies with lavish orchestral arrangements to produce such pop monuments as “Da Doo Ron Ron,” “Be My Baby” and “He’s a Rebel.” He was the rare self-conscious artist in rock’s early years and cultivated an image of mystery and power with his dark shades and impassive expression. Tom Wolfe declared him the “first tycoon of teen.” Bruce Springsteen and Brian Wilson openly replicated his grandiose recording techniques and wide-eyed romanticism, and John Lennon called him “the greatest record producer ever.” The secret to his sound: an overdubbed onslaught of instruments, vocals and sound effects that changed the way pop records were recorded. He called the result, “Little symphonies for the kids.” By his mid-20s his “little symphonies” had resulted in nearly two dozen hit singles and made him a millionaire. “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling,” the operatic Righteous Brothers ballad which topped the charts in 1965, has been tabulated as the song most played on radio and television — counting the many cover versions — in the 20th century. But thanks in part to the arrival of the Beatles, his chart success would soon fade. When “River Deep-Mountain High,” an aptly-named 1966 release that featured Tina Turner, failed to catch on, Spector shut down his record label and withdrew from the business for three years. He would go on to produce the Beatles and Lennon among others, but he was now serving the artists, instead of the other way around. In 1969, Spector was called in to salvage the Beatles’ “Let It Be” album, a troubled “back to basics” production marked by dissension within the band. Although Lennon praised Spector’s work, bandmate Paul McCartney was enraged, especially when Spector added strings and a choir to McCartney’s “The Long and Winding Road.” Years later, McCartney would oversee a remastered “Let it Be,” removing Spector’s contributions. A documentary of the making of Lennon’s 1971 “Imagine” album showed the ex-Beatle clearly in charge, prodding Spector over a backing vocal, a line none of Spector’s early artists would have dared cross. Spector worked on George Harrison’s acclaimed post-Beatles triple album, “All Things Must Pass,” co-produced Lennon’s “Imagine,” and the less successful “Some Time in New York City,” which included Spector’s picture over a caption that read, “To Know Him is to Love Him.” Spector also had a memorable film role, a cameo as a drug dealer in “Easy Rider.” The producer himself was played by Al Pacino in a 2013 HBO movie. The volume, and violence, of Spector’s music reflected a dark side he could barely contain even at his peak. He was imperious, temperamental and dangerous, remembered bitterly by Darlene Love, Ronnie Spector and others who worked with him. Years of stories of his waving guns at recording artists in the studio and threatening women would come back to haunt him after Clarkson’s death. According to witnesses she had agreed, somewhat reluctantly, to accompany him home from the Sunset Strip’s House of Blues in West Hollywood, where she worked Shortly after their arrival in Alhambra in the pre-dawn hours of Feb. 3, 2003, a chauffeur reported Spector came out of the house holding a gun, blood on his hands, and told him, “I think I killed somebody.” He would later tell friends Clarkson had shot herself. The case was fraught with mystery, and it took authorities a year to file charges. In the meantime, Spector remained free on $1 million bail. When he was finally indicted for murder, he lashed out at authorities, angrily telling reporters: “The actions of the Hitler-like DA and his storm trooper henchmen are reprehensible, unconscionable and despicable.” As a defendant, his eccentricity took center stage. He would arrive in court for pretrial hearings in theatrical outfits, usually featuring high-heeled boots, frock coats and wildly styled wigs. He arrived at one hearing in a chauffeur-driven stretch Hummer. Once the 2007 trial began, however, he toned down his attire. It ended in a 10-2 deadlock leaning toward conviction. His defense had argued that the actress, despondent about her fading career, shot herself through the mouth. A retrial got underway in October 2008. Harvey Phillip Spector, in his mid-60s when he was charged with murder, had been born on Dec. 26, 1939, in New York City’s borough of the Bronx. Bernard Spector, his father, was an ironworker. His mother, Bertha, was a seamstress. In 1947, Spector’s father committed suicide because of family indebtedness, an event that would shape his son’s life in many ways. Four years later, Spector’s mother moved the family to Los Angeles, where Phil attended Fairfax High School, located in a largely Jewish neighborhood on the edge of Hollywood. For decades the school has been a source of future musical talent. At Fairfax, Spector performed in talent shows and formed a group called the Teddy Bears with friends. He was reserved and insecure, but his musical abilities were obvious. He had perfect pitch and easily learned to play several instruments. He was just 17 when his group recorded its first hit single, a romantic ballad written and produced by Spector that would become a pop classic: “To Know Him is to Love Him,” was inspired by the inscription on his father’s tombstone. A short, skinny kid with big dreams and growing demons, Spector went on to attend the University of California, Los Angeles for a year before dropping out to return to New York. He briefly considered becoming a French interpreter at the United Nations before falling in with the musicians at New York’s celebrated Brill Building. The Broadway edifice was then at the heart of popular music’s Tin Pan Alley, where writers, composers, singers and musicians turned out hit songs. He began working with star composers Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, who had met at Fairfax High a few years before Spector arrived. Ultimately, he found his niche in producing. During this period he also co-wrote the hit song, “Spanish Harlem,” with Ben E. King, and played lead guitar on the Drifters’ “On Broadway.” “I had come back to New York from California where there were all these green lawns and trees, and there was just this poverty and decay in Harlem,” he would recall later. “The song was an expression of hope and faith in the young people of Harlem ... that there would be better times ahead.” For a time he had his own production company, Philles Records, with partner Lester Silles, where he developed his signature sound. He assembled such respected studio musicians as arranger Jack Nitzsche, guitarist Tommy Tedesco, pianist Leon Russell and drummer Hal Blaine, and gave early breaks to Glen Campbell, Sonny Bono and Bono’s future wife, Cher. In the early 1960s, he had hit after hit and one notable flop: the album “A Christmas Gift to You,” released, tragically, on Nov. 22, 1963, the day President Kennedy was assassinated, the worst possible time for such a joyous record. “A Christmas Gift,” featuring the Ronettes singing “Frosty the Snowman” and Love’s version of “White Christmas,” is now considered a classic and a perennial radio favorite during the holiday season. Spector’s domestic life, along with his career, eventually came apart. After his first marriage, to Annette Merar, broke up, Ronettes leader singer Ronnie Bennett became his girlfriend and muse. He married her in 1968 and they adopted three children. But she divorced him after six years, claiming in a memoir that he held her prisoner in their mansion, where she said he kept a gold coffin in the basement and told her he would kill her and put her in it if she ever tried to leave him. When the Ronettes were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007, Spector sent along his congratulations. But in an acceptance speech by his ex-wife, she never mentioned him while thanking numerous other people. Darlene Love also feuded with him, accusing Spector of failing to credit her for her vocals on “He’s a Rebel” and other songs, but she did praise him when inducted into the Hall. Spector himself became a Hall member in 1989. As his marriages deteriorated, recording artists also began to quit working with Spector and musical styles passed him by. He preferred singles to albums, calling the latter, “Two hits and 10 pieces of junk.” He initially refused to record his music in multichannel stereo, claiming the process damaged the sound. A Spector box set retrospective was called “Back to Mono.” By the mid-1970s, Spector had largely retreated from the music business. He would emerge occasionally to work on special projects, including Leonard Cohen’s album, “Death of a Ladies’ Man” and The Ramones’ “End of the Century.” Both were marred by reports of Spector’s instability. In 1973, Lennon worked on an album of rock ‘n roll oldies with Spector, only to have Spector disappear with the tapes. The finished work, “Rock ‘n’ Roll,” didn’t come out until 1975. In 1982 Spector married Janis Lynn Zavala and the couple had twins, Nicole and Phillip Jr. The boy died at age 10 of leukemia. Six months before his first murder trial began, Spector married Rachelle Short, a 26-year-old singer and actress who accompanied him to court every day. He filed for divorce in 2016. In a 2005 court deposition, he testified that he had been on medication for manic depression for eight years. “No sleep, depression, mood changes, mood swings, hard to live with, hard to concentrate, just hard — a hard time getting through life,” he said. “I’ve been called a genius and I think a genius is not there all the time and has borderline insanity.” Linda Deutsch is a retired special correspondent for The Associated Press. The Spector murder trial was one of many sensational cases she covered during her 48-year career as a Los Angeles-based trial reporter.
17 Jan 2021 at 5:33 pm
Marta Torres was shot inside this Evanston restaurant on Jan. 9. She died Saturday. | Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Sun-TimesMarta Torres, 61, was shot in an Evanston IHOP. She died Saturday, according to the Cook County medical examiner’s office. A 61-year-woman shot in an Evanston IHOP parking lot near the end of a shooting spree last weekend has died, according to the Cook County medical examiner’s office. Marta Torres, 61, died at 6 p.m. Saturday at St. Francis Hospital. She is the fourth person killed by in a crime spree police say was committed by gunman Jason Nightengale, 32. Police said Nightengale shot seven people in Chicago and Evanston before he was killed by Evanston police officers Jan. 9. The current conditions of the other three people wounded could not be confirmed Sunday. Chicago police officers said the spree began with Nightengale fatally shooting a 30-year-old man in a parking garage in the 5000 block of East End. The University of Chicago later identified that man as Ph.D. student Yiran Fan. Then, in an apartment complex about a block away, Nightengale shot and killed 46-year-old Aisha Nevell, known better as Aisha Johnson, who manned the door at an East Hyde Park condominium, police said. He also shot a 77-year-old woman in the head while grabbing her mail at the complex, according to police. Nightengale proceeded to an apartment building in the 5500 block of South East End and forced a man he knew at gunpoint to give Nightengale his red Toyota, police said. He drove to the 9300 block of South Halsted and entered a convenience store around 3 p.m. He shot and killed 20-year-old Anthony Faulkner, police said, and also shot an 81-year-old woman who was left in critical condition as of last Sunday. An hour later, a 15-year-old girl was shot in the head as she rode in a vehicle in the 10300 block of South Halsted Street with her mother. Brown said Nightengale is believed to be responsible for that shooting as well. It left the girl in critical condition as of last Sunday. About 5:45 p.m., Evanston police responded to shots fired at the Evanston IHOP where Torres was held hostage and then shot by Nightengale, police said. Nightengale then ran out of the restaurant and got in a shootout with Evanston officers in a nearby Dollar General parking lot, where he was killed. Nightengale’s family told the Sun-Times he “was fighting some demons.” Leading up to the shootings, the man also posted dozens of videos online in which he ranted about Satan, waved a gun and talked about killing random people.
17 Jan 2021 at 4:40 pm
Two armed robberies were reported Jan. 15 in Rogers Park. | Sun-Times file photoThe two robberies were reported within 10 minutes of each other on the North Side. Police are warning residents of a pair of recent armed robberies reported in Rogers Park on the North Side. In each incident someone was approached by a man and woman who implied they were armed, then went in their pockets to steal their belongings, Chicago police said in a community alert. The robberies happened about 11:30 a.m. Jan 15 in the 6500 block of North Glenwood Avenue and about 10 minutes later in the 6500 block of North Sheridan Avenue, police said. Anyone with information is asked to contact Area Three detectives at 312-744-8263.